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Lycoming in Mullins Sea Eagle

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wheels4u22
New member
Username: wheels4u22

Post Number: 1
Registered: 10-2012
Posted on Tuesday, October 23, 2012 - 11:22 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Can anyone help me date this 1930's Mullins Sea Eagle? I believe it is a 1931 and would appreciate any info that can be offered. I am also missing a few items and if anyone may be able to point me in the right direction that would be great (carb air cleaner assy, front engine cover for starters). I have enclosed both boat and engine tags.
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ldobbins
Senior Member
Username: ldobbins

Post Number: 99
Registered: 12-2002
Posted on Tuesday, October 23, 2012 - 02:54 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Greetings,

Hull number 8527 is a 1938 Deluxe Sea Eagle that came with a Lycoming 4 cylinder model UAE #3574. This is a 54 HP model. The earlier to mid 30s, Sea Eagles had the 45 HP UAD Lycoming.

There are about 10 of these boats known around the US, including a 1931 I believe.

I hopefully have some other SNs in my records at home. I will try to check.

Cheers,

Lew "The West Coast Sterling Guy"
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ldobbins
Senior Member
Username: ldobbins

Post Number: 100
Registered: 12-2002
Posted on Tuesday, October 23, 2012 - 02:56 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Correction, should read UAB 45 HP for the earlier Sea Eagles. Late 30s is UAE.
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wheels4u22
New member
Username: wheels4u22

Post Number: 2
Registered: 10-2012
Posted on Tuesday, October 23, 2012 - 07:35 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks for looking in to that Lew,

Mullins built the Sea Eagle out of Salem OH from 1931 till approx 1935 which is where mine was built. Then moved production to Oil City PA till the end of production. Your id plate shows oil city. My boat must be between 1931 and 1934 but am hoping the engine plate might tell me based on the engine serial #. I am not sure where find this info.
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bruce
Senior Member
Username: bruce

Post Number: 332
Registered: 07-2002
Posted on Tuesday, October 23, 2012 - 08:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Chris, From a 2005 ACBS directory, I find William Mullin with a 15'9" 1935 Sea Eagle hull number 8402. E-mail wmullin@boatcheck.com Also Ron Wolfman with a 15'9"1936 Sea Eagle hull # 8522 in NJ; phone 925 254 6443 evenings. I'm guessing your hull is late 1935/early 1936. Yours must be one of the last hulls built in Ohio (?)
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ldobbins
Senior Member
Username: ldobbins

Post Number: 101
Registered: 12-2002
Posted on Wednesday, October 24, 2012 - 02:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Ron Wolfman's boat is on the west coast for sale. I have extensive photos of this boat just after it was restored some 20 plus years ago in Sacramento. Unfortunately they are film prints and not electronic. Here are a couple of pictures of it on Clear Lake, CA for an ACBS function in June of 2006. Her current name is "Steeler". Her previous name when restored was "Nin-Can-Poop".

Cheers,

Lew
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ned_l
New member
Username: ned_l

Post Number: 2
Registered: 08-2012
Posted on Friday, October 26, 2012 - 09:44 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I've often thought about a missed opportunity I had about 30 years ago where I found one of these Mullins speedboats with the four cylinder Lycoming in it abandon in a boat yard near where I grew up in NJ. It was really rough, but mostly there. Oh well, I guess that just makes the surviving ones a bit more rare.
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ldobbins
Senior Member
Username: ldobbins

Post Number: 102
Registered: 12-2002
Posted on Friday, October 26, 2012 - 11:49 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

They are fairly rare but no more desirable. The cool thing is that they are a less expensive restoration than any wood boat and generally a little easier working with the 2 piece pressed Armco Ingot Iron hull and the many deck plates.

Even with the later 58 HP Lycoming UAE,they still take 2 forevers to get up on the plane unless you are at sea level.

I often thought it would be cool to stuff a Ford Flathead marine engine in there. It would have to be a small reverse gear however. At least it would never overheat!

Cheers,

Lew
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ned_l
Member
Username: ned_l

Post Number: 4
Registered: 08-2012
Posted on Monday, November 05, 2012 - 02:33 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I've thought those Mullins boats would be easier restorations. Your comments on there 'performance' (or lack of) are interesting, I sort of thought that it seemed like not much engine in that boat.
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ldobbins
Senior Member
Username: ldobbins

Post Number: 106
Registered: 12-2002
Posted on Tuesday, November 06, 2012 - 04:49 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

A Mullins Sea Eagle or Deluxe Sea Eagle to restore are not too hard and do not require nearly as many hours as their mahogany counterpart. With a one piece Armco Ingot Iron hull and a series of 5 deck plates, it is all fairly straight forward.

Where the problems come in is that it is a small boat. Building or rather restoring it in a logical sequence with all of the deck plates removed does make it easier. But once the engine and the 5 floatation tanks are installed, there is NO room to do anything!

The frames are all white oak and traditional bottom, top sides and deck framing to support the deck plates. Another challenge is the decision to "restore" or modify to make a better looking boat. With the original deck seams, the boat is not as attractive as it could be. Most of these get a coat of glass or epoxy covering the lap seams of the deck plates.

As to the power, the UAB at 45 HP is anemic, especially at Tahoe's 6,227' above sea level equating to 25% less atmospheric pressure thus 25% less HP. The UAE of the late 30's helped but not enough.

Cheers,

Lew
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ned_l
Member
Username: ned_l

Post Number: 5
Registered: 08-2012
Posted on Thursday, November 08, 2012 - 03:06 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Neat information, thank you. I've thought a Mullins of any sort would be a fun (& easy) boat to restore, getting to practice a bit of 'tin knocking' while at it. - There aren't many around here in southern N.E. though. (I know of someone who owned a early 1900's rowboat that needed restoring, but I never got to see it. He may still own it for all I know.)

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