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Ignition and coil build up.

Old Marine Engine » Timers, Magnetos, Ignition » Ignition and coil build up. « Previous Next »

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Claude Fields
Member
Username: claude

Post Number: 6
Registered: 09-2012
Posted on Wednesday, October 03, 2012 - 04:44 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Iím using a voltmeter to measure open and closed between the igniter terminal and the engine block. Is the voltage building continuously on the turn of the crank until the engine fires? Or does the igniter only close momentarily to build up the spark before it fires?
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J.B. Castagnos
Senior Member
Username: jb_castagnos

Post Number: 731
Registered: 07-2002


Posted on Wednesday, October 03, 2012 - 08:30 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Battery powered ignitors were generally open, closed before firing and snapped open. This saved the battery from the constant drain. Magneto ignitors can stay closed until firing. What brand engine are you working on?
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Claude Fields
Member
Username: claude

Post Number: 7
Registered: 09-2012
Posted on Saturday, October 06, 2012 - 08:21 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Iím a novice to this system. Iím working on a 5 HP Acadia engine. It wasnít making sense to me as I thought the coil would need more time to build up the voltage. Now it makes sense. Did the old mariners carry a spare battery when they went to sea? I love the engineering and quality of the engine. Iím also rebuilding a McCormick-Deering Model M but there are plenty of books and parts for them. This Acadia is a bit more challenging.
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J.B. Castagnos
Senior Member
Username: jb_castagnos

Post Number: 734
Registered: 07-2002


Posted on Sunday, October 07, 2012 - 06:46 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Down here they used dry cells, usually six. This was with a buzz coil. If one died you could remove it and make it home, I guess experience taught them to carry spares.

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